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Liver Panel

39

Testing specifically to assess the health of the liver.

  • Total Protein

    Total Protein is useful in evaluating patients for nutritional status, liver disease, protein-losing renal and gastrointestinal diseases, and many other medical conditions. Elevated concentrations may be observed in patients with monoclonal gammopathies, autoimmune hepatitis, inflammation, and other medical conditions.

  • Serum Albumin

    Serum Albumin measurements are used in the monitoring and treatment of numerous diseases involving those related to nutrition and pathology particularly in the liver and kidney. Serum albumin is valuable when following response to therapy where improvement in the serum albumin level is the best sign of successful medical treatment. There may be a loss of albumin in the gastrointestinal tract, in the urine secondary to renal damage or direct loss of albumin through the skin. More than 50% of patients with gluten enteropathy have depressed albumin. The only cause of increased albumin is dehydration; there is no naturally occurring hyperalbuminemia.

  • Albumin/Globulin Ratio

    Albumin / Globulin Ratio – Calculation Ratio concentration of Albumin to other Proteins in Blood

  • Globulin Calculation

    Calculation of Total Protein minus Albumin concentration

  • Total Bilirubin

    Measurement of the levels of Total Bilirubin is used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver, hemolytic, hematologic, and metabolic disorders, including hepatitis and gallbladder obstructive disease.

  • Direct Bilirubin

    Measurement of the levels of Direct (conjugated) Bilirubin is used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver, hemolytic, hematologic, and metabolic disorders, including hepatitis and gall bladder obstruction. The assessment of direct bilirubin is helpful in the differentiation of hepatic disorders. The increase in total bilirubin associated with obstructive jaundice is primarily due to the direct (conjugated) fraction. Both direct and indirect bilirubin are increased in the serum with hepatitis.

  • Serum Alkaline Phosphatase Levels

    Serum Alkaline Phosphatase levels are of interest in the diagnosis of hepatobiliary disorders and bone disease associated with increased osteoblastic activity. Moderate elevations of alkaline phosphatase may be seen in several conditions that do not involve the liver or bone. Among these are Hodgkin’s disease, congestive heart failure, ulcerative colitis, regional enteritis, and intra-abdominal bacterial infections. Elevations are also observed during the third trimester of pregnancy.

  • Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT) (GPT)

    Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT) (GPT) measurements are particularly useful in the diagnosis and management of certain liver diseases, e.g., viral hepatitis and cirrhosis. ALT activity in tissue is generally much lower than aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activity and is found in highest concentrations in the liver. Significant elevations of ALT occur only in diseases of the liver. ALT is often measured in conjunction with AST to determine whether the source of the AST is the liver or the heart. ALT is normally not elevated in cases of myocardial infarction, i.e., a normal ALT, in conjunction with an elevated AST, tends to suggest cardiac disease. However, slight elevations of ALT may occur if an infarct destroys a very large volume of heart muscle.

  • Aspartate Aminotransferase AST (GOT)

    Aspartate Aminotransferase AST (GOT) is widely distributed throughout the tissues with significant amounts being in the heart and liver. Lesser amounts areĀ found in skeletal muscles, kidneys, pancreas, spleen, lungs, and brain. Injury to these tissues results in the release of the AST enzyme to general circulation. In myocardial infarction, serum AST may begin to rise within 6-8 hours after onset, peak within two days and return to normal by the fourth or fifth day post infarction. An increase in serum AST is also found with hepatitis, liver necrosis, cirrhosis, and liver metastasis.

  • Elevated Gamma Glutamyl Transferase (GGT)

    Elevated Gamma Glutamyl Transferase (GGT) is found in all forms of liver disease. Measurement of GGT is used in the diagnosis and treatment of alcoholic cirrhosis, as well as primary and secondary liver tumors. It is more sensitive than alkaline phosphatase, the transaminases, and leucine aminopeptidase in detecting obstructive jaundice, cholangitis, and cholecystitis. Normal levels of GGT are seen in skeletal diseases; thus, GGT in serum can be used to ascertain whether a disease, suggested by elevated alkaline phosphatase, is skeletal or hepatobiliary.