Back to Test Catalog

Complete Chemistry Panel


Assesses blood sugar, calcium, electrolytes, and protein levels, as well as kidney and liver functions.

  • Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT) (GPT)

    Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT) (GPT) measurements are particularly useful in the diagnosis and management of certain liver diseases, e.g., viral hepatitis and cirrhosis. ALT activity in tissue is generally much lower than aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activity and is found in highest concentrations in the liver. Significant elevations of ALT occur only in diseases of the liver. ALT is often measured in conjunction with AST to determine whether the source of the AST is the liver or the heart. ALT is normally not elevated in cases of myocardial infarction, i.e., a normal ALT, in conjunction with an elevated AST, tends to suggest cardiac disease. However, slight elevations of ALT may occur if an infarct destroys a very large volume of heart muscle.

  • Albumin/Globulin Ratio

    Albumin / Globulin Ratio – Calculation Ratio concentration of Albumin to other Proteins in Blood

  • Aspartate Aminotransferase AST (GOT)

    Aspartate Aminotransferase AST (GOT) is widely distributed throughout the tissues with significant amounts being in the heart and liver. Lesser amounts are found in skeletal muscles, kidneys, pancreas, spleen, lungs, and brain. Injury to these tissues results in the release of the AST enzyme to general circulation. In myocardial infarction, serum AST may begin to rise within 6-8 hours after onset, peak within two days and return to normal by the fourth or fifth day post infarction. An increase in serum AST is also found with hepatitis, liver necrosis, cirrhosis, and liver metastasis.

  • BUN/Creatinine Ratio

    Calculation Ratio of BUN to Creatinine.

  • Carbon Dioxide Measurement (CO2)

    CO2 Carbon Dioxide Measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of numerous potentially serious disorders associated with changes in body acid-base balance.

  • Direct Bilirubin

    Measurement of the levels of Direct (conjugated) Bilirubin is used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver, hemolytic, hematologic, and metabolic disorders, including hepatitis and gall bladder obstruction. The assessment of direct bilirubin is helpful in the differentiation of hepatic disorders. The increase in total bilirubin associated with obstructive jaundice is primarily due to the direct (conjugated) fraction. Both direct and indirect bilirubin are increased in the serum with hepatitis.

  • Elevated Gamma Glutamyl Transferase (GGT)

    Elevated Gamma Glutamyl Transferase (GGT) is found in all forms of liver disease. Measurement of GGT is used in the diagnosis and treatment of alcoholic cirrhosis, as well as primary and secondary liver tumors. It is more sensitive than alkaline phosphatase, the transaminases, and leucine aminopeptidase in detecting obstructive jaundice, cholangitis, and cholecystitis. Normal levels of GGT are seen in skeletal diseases; thus, GGT in serum can be used to ascertain whether a disease, suggested by elevated alkaline phosphatase, is skeletal or hepatobiliary.

  • Globulin Calculation

    Calculation of Total Protein minus Albumin concentration

  • Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR)

    Estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR)– the best measure of kidney function.

  • Glucose

    Glucose is the type of sugar found in blood. Normally there is very little or no glucose in urine. When the blood sugar level is very high, as in uncontrolled diabetes, the sugar spills over into the urine. Glucose can also be found in urine when the kidneys are damaged or diseased.

  • Potassium Measurement

    Potassium measurements are useful in monitoring electrolyte balance in the diagnosis and treatment of disease conditions characterized by low or high blood potassium levels. Potassium is elevated in adrenal cortical insufficiency, acute renal failure and in some cases of diabetic acidosis. Potassium is decreased in diuretic administration and renal tubular acidosis.

  • Protein

    Protein normally isn’t found in the urine. Fever, hard exercise, pregnancy, and some diseases, especially kidney disease, may cause protein to be in the urine.

  • Serum Albumin

    Serum Albumin measurements are used in the monitoring and treatment of numerous diseases involving those related to nutrition and pathology particularly in the liver and kidney. Serum albumin is valuable when following response to therapy where improvement in the serum albumin level is the best sign of successful medical treatment. There may be a loss of albumin in the gastrointestinal tract, in the urine secondary to renal damage or direct loss of albumin through the skin. More than 50% of patients with gluten enteropathy have depressed albumin. The only cause of increased albumin is dehydration; there is no naturally occurring hyperalbuminemia.

  • Serum Alkaline Phosphatase Levels

    Serum Alkaline Phosphatase levels are of interest in the diagnosis of hepatobiliary disorders and bone disease associated with increased osteoblastic activity. Moderate elevations of alkaline phosphatase may be seen in several conditions that do not involve the liver or bone. Among these are Hodgkin’s disease, congestive heart failure, ulcerative colitis, regional enteritis, and intra-abdominal bacterial infections. Elevations are also observed during the third trimester of pregnancy.

  • Serum Calcium

    Serum Calcium is involved in the regulation of neuromuscular and enzyme activity, bone metabolism and blood coagulation. Calcium blood levels are controlled by a complex interaction of parathyroid hormone, vitamin D, calcitonin and adrenal cortical steroids. Calcium measurements are useful in the diagnosis of parathyroid disease, some bone disorders and chronic renal disease. A low level of calcium may result in tetany.

  • Serum Chloride

    Serum Chloride is the major extracellular anion and counter-balances the major cation, sodium, maintaining electrical neutrality of the body fluids. Two thirds of the total anion concentration in extracellular fluids is chloride and it is significantly involved in maintaining proper hydration and osmotic pressure. Movement of chloride ions across the red blood cell membrane is essential for the transport of biocarbonate ions in response to changing concentrations of carbon dioxide. Chloride measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of electrolyte and metabolic disorders such as cystic fibrosis and diabetic acidosis.

  • Serum Creatinine

    Serum Creatinine is useful in the evaluation of kidney function and in monitoring renal dialysis. A serum creatinine result within the reference range does not rule out renal function impairment: serum creatinine is not sensitive to early renal damage since it varies with age, gender and ethnic background. The impact of these variables can be reduced by an estimation of the glomerular filtration rate using an equation that includes serum creatinine, age and gender.

  • Serum Glucose Levels

    Serum Glucose levels may be abnormally high (hyperglycemia) or abnormally low (hypoglycemia). Glucose measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of carbohydrate metabolic disorders including diabetes mellitus, idiopathic hypoglycemia, and pancreatic islet cell neoplasm.

  • Sodium Measurement

    Sodium measurements are useful in the diagnosis and treatment of aldosteronism, diabetes insipidus, adrenal hypertension, Addison’s Disease, dehydration, inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion, or other diseases involving electrolyte imbalance.

  • Total Bilirubin

    Measurement of the levels of Total Bilirubin is used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver, hemolytic, hematologic, and metabolic disorders, including hepatitis and gallbladder obstructive disease.

  • Total Protein

    Total Protein is useful in evaluating patients for nutritional status, liver disease, protein-losing renal and gastrointestinal diseases, and many other medical conditions. Elevated concentrations may be observed in patients with monoclonal gammopathies, autoimmune hepatitis, inflammation, and other medical conditions.

  • Urea Nitrogen (BUN)

    Urea Nitrogen (BUN) is the principle waste product of protein catabolism. BUN is most commonly measured in the diagnosis and treatment of certain renal and metabolic diseases. Increased BUN concentration may result from increased production of urea due to (1) diet or excessive destruction of cellular proteins as occurs in massive infection and fevers, (2) reduced renal perfusion resulting from dehydration or heart failure, (3) nearly all types of kidney disease, and (4) mechanical obstruction to urine excretion such as is caused by stones, tumors, infection, or stricture. Decreased urea levels are less frequent and occur primarily in advanced liver disease and in overhydration.